http://schema.org/InStock

Baba's Cook Book

Product Code: SAAB1001
Availability: 37

Price: $15.00

Forward to Baba's Cook Book

Ever since I was a young girl, I loved to help Mom in the kitchen. Growing up in a family of eleven, there always seemed to be something cooking at all times. From mouth-watering, fresh bread baked in the outdoor oven, to the pots of wholesome soups bubbling on the woodstoves, to roasters of creamed chicken, cabbage rolls and fresh berry pies tucked in the oven, these memories remain vivid in my mind and heart as everyone had an indirect part in the preparation of the meals. 

Bringing in the milk and cream, gathering of eggs, picking garden vegetables and wild berries to butchering our own meat and poultry were never chores but an opportunity to help one another of the family and assist, indirect­ly, in the preparation of the meals.
 
My place on the farm was in the house, right in the kitchen, helping and learning the "secrets" and "basics" in making the food tasty and delicious. Over the years, I have always sought out good food and the recipes that came with them. Through the vast travels with my family, I have compiled a wealth of special recipes along with the traditional favorites that I grew up with. Many recipes here have been shared with you by friends, family and neighbours. With a common love of eating tasty food, I present to you - "Baba's Cook Book". 

Happy Cooking, 
Emily Linkiewich

Table of Contents

Traditional Ukrainian Christmas Eve Dishes  

Traditional Ukrainian Easter Breakfast 

Soups 

Meats and Casseroles

Fish

Breads.and Buns

Cakes and Tortes

Squares

Cookies

Pastry and Pies

Canning and Pickles

Icings 

Salads

Desserts 

Household Hints

10

19

26

29

46

54

61

90

98

108

122

129

133

138

146

Christmas (Rizdvo) 

The most beloved of all Ukrainian festivities is the Sviata Vecheria (Holy Sup­per). The supper differs from others in that twelve meatless dishes (symbolic of the twelve apostles) are prepared without animal fat, milk or milk products. This is done because Christmas is preceded by a period of fasting which ends on Christmas Day, after midnight or morning Church Service.

Respected and honoured customs pervade the house on Christmas Eve. The sup­per table is first strewn with a handful of hay (to remind us of the birth of Christ in a manger) then covered with an embroidered tablecloth. A braided round bread, kolach, symbolizing prosperity is placed in esteem in the center of the dining table; a sheaf of grain, the didukh, is set in the corner of the dining room, repre­sentative as a symbol of the gathering together of the family; a lit candle in the window invites those who are homeless; an extra place setting on the table is made for any member of the family who has deceased during the year; as soon as the children eagerly denote the appearance of the first star in the Eastern Heavens, the meal begins with the Lord's Prayer.
 
The eminently indispensable dish, Kutia, is raised in a spoon by the head of the family who invokes God's grace and greets all with the tradition Christmas greet­ing "Khrystos Rodyvsia!" (Christ is Born) to which the reply: "Slavim Yoho!" (Let us Glorify Him) is given.
 

After the Kutia, other delectable dishes are then served. Christmas Carols begin­ning with the oldest known koliady "Boh Predvichny" (God Eternal) are sung together. It is a night for family togetherness. 

From: Baba's Cook Book, page 8

 Traditional Ukrainian Christmas Eve Dishes 

  • Kutia (wheat)
  • Sauerkraut and peas
  • Borsch (beet soup)
  • Jellied fish
  • Fried fish
  • Verenyky (prune, sauerkraut, raisin and poppy seed fillings)
  • Hlubtsi (cabbage rolls)
  • Cooked beans
  • Beets with mushrooms
  • Stewed dry fruits
  • Kolach (bread)
  • Pompushky
  • Beverage

 

Easter (Velykden) 

The observance of the Great Lent six weeks before Easter initiates the duration of time which spiritual purification, personal retreat, and fasting are observed. Con­fession and Holy Communion are then partaken by the faithful so as to cleanse and purify the soul.

One of the mosl beautiful traditions of the Ukrainian people is the writing of decorated Easter eggs called "Pysanky." In pagan times, pysanky symbolized the release of the earth from the bonds of winter and the arrival of spring. They are associated with mythical beliefs and magical powers. After the coming of Chris­tianity, the pysanky were then associated with the Resurrection, a symbol of eter­nal life. A customary exchange or gift of a pysanka at Easter is something to be cherished and loved. 

At break of dawn on Easter Sunday a special Resurrection Service is held which includes a procession around the church. The most joyful aspect of the service is the heralding of the resurrected Christ in 1he singing of Khrystos Voskres (Christ is Risen). With the conclusion of the service, weather permitting, all exit 10 out­side the church and form a circle. The embroidered covered baskets containing an array of meticulously prepared foods are proudly exhibited in front of each family. A candle is lit and placed in each basket. Anxious children peer from behind the colorful woven vessels to watch the priest bless the food with Holy water. We now extend the traditional Easter greeting "Khrystos Voskres" (Christ is Risen), to which the reply is "Voistyno Voskres" (Truly He is Risen). 

Families return home to break the long fast with a delicious meal. After the Lord's Prayer and the traditional Easter salutation, a blessed egg is cut into pieces, one for everyone present and then a little of each type of food from the basket is consumed. Following this, larger portions are served from a variety of prepared dishes. 

This observance not only expresses the families unity but fills their religious aspirations and beliefs in the preservation of a glorious time-honored ritual and tradition. 

From: Baba's Cook Book, page 18

 Traditional Ukrainian Easter Breakfast

  • Blessed boiled egg
  • Paska
  • Babka
  • Ham
  • Pork roast
  • Kyshka (buckwheat sausage)
  • Kobassa (ham sausage)
  • Salteson
  • Easter syrnyk
  • Beet and horseradish relish
  • Butter
  • Pysanky and krashanky (decorated eggs for oranamentation)

 

eshop003a
eshop004a